Harmon Killebrew Hit ‘Em a Long Way

By Glen Sparks

Harmon Killebrew did not just hit baseballs. He punished them for getting into his way. Killebrew blasted 573 home runs into orbit during a 22-year career.

He mashed the first of those long, long, long balls on June 24, 1955, at Griffith Stadium in Washington, D.C. Detroit Tigers starter Billy Hoeft served up the pitch. Killebrew, a 19-year-old rookie with the Washington Senators, deposited it into the bleachers, the highlight of the day for the Senators, who lost 18-7. (Sign of the times: Detroit starter Hoeft gave up 12 hits and seven runs and still went the distance.) Only 4,188 fans “filled” the stands at Griffith for this Friday tussle.

“Killer” eventually led the American League in home runs six times, topping out at 49 in 1964 and 1969. The slugger stood a few inches shy of 6-feet tall but possessed the forearms of a lumberjack.

Pitchers started getting twitchy as soon as Killebrew entered the on-deck circle. His bats served as a launch vehicle. Baltimore Orioles Manager Paul Richards said, “Killebrew can hit the ball out of any park, including Yellowstone.” He once belted a pitch over the left-field roof at Tiger Stadium in Detroit.

Harmon Clayton Killebrew was born June 29, 1936, in little Payette, Idaho, near the Idaho-Oregon state line, one of five children. His dad, Harmon Clayton Sr., played football at little Milliken College in Decatur, Ill, and encouraged his sons to play hard. Here is one great story:

Harmon and his brother Robert were messing around in the yard with Dad. Katherine Killebrew took one look at the beat-up lawn and said, “You’re ruining the grass.” The game went on. Pops Killebrew said to his wife, “We’re not raising grass. We’re raising boys.”

Payette High School never had an athlete like Harmon Killebrew Jr. The youngster earned 12 varsity letters and was signed by the Washington Senators, thanks to a tip from U.S. Sen. Herman Welker, R-Idaho. (It could not have been a hard sell. Killebrew was batting .847 for a local semi-pro team.)

Four days later, Killebrew made his debut with the Senators. He pinch-ran for Clyde Vollmer. Killebrew was six days shy of turning 18. Over the next few years, the muscular prospect with a compact, but powerful, right-handed swing, sat mostly on the Washington bench as a bonus baby. Only later did he get to punish young, impressionable minor-league pitchers.

Finally, in 1959, Killer played in his first full Major League season. He promptly led the A.L. with 42 home runs. He also made the All-Star team, something he would do another 11 times.

The Senators left for Minneapolis-St. Paul in 1961 and were re-christened as the Twins. Killebrew took his home-run swing with him. From 1961-64, he belted 188 balls out of the park.

He also led the league in RBI three times. And, despite a pedestrian .256 career batting average, Killebrew retired with a .376 on-base percentage, thanks to a good eye and careful pitching. He topped A.L. batters in intentional walks three times.

The baseball writers elected Killebrew to the Hall of Fame in 1984. His No. 3 is retired by the Twins, of course, and a street at the famous Mall of America in Bloomington, Minn., bears his name. One rumor is that the MLB logo is modeled after Killebrew

Killer now stands at No. 11 on the all-time home run list. He is tied with Rogers Hornsby at 38th on the RBI list (1,584) and is 15th on the all-time walks list (1,559). He also is Idaho’s all-time home run champ by far, 502 ahead of Vance Law.

Known for his kind heart, Killebrew organized the Danny Thomson Memorial Golf Tournament in honor of a Twins teammate who died of leukemia. The tournament still goes on every year in Sun Valley, Idaho, and benefits cancer research efforts.

Killebrew spent time as a broadcaster for a few years after retiring, worked as a coach and nearly died from infections after suffering a collapsed lung and damaged esophagus in 1990. He passed away in hospice care of esophageal cancer on May 17, 2011, at the age of 74.

The slugger once said, “I didn’t have evil intentions, but I guess I did have power.”

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