Babe Ruth in Death Remains Bigger than Life

Original caption: New York: In the Yankee clubhouse at the Polo Grounds this afternoon, George Herman

By Glen Sparks

Babe Ruth, dead at age 53, lay in state at Yankee Stadium, the house he built.

Fans, former teammates, dignitaries and assorted drinking buddies paid their respects to America’s greatest athlete on Aug. 17-18, 1948. About 77,000 people filed by.

The site of a still Ruth probably struck many of them odd. Did the Babe ever stay still for long in life? One of his New York Yankee teammates, Ping Bodie, said, “I didn’t room with Babe Ruth. I roomed with his suitcase.” (This quote is attributed to most of Ruth’s roommates over the years.)

He did things big. “I swing big,” he said. “I like to live as big as I can.” He made headlines. “Babe Hits 60th Home Run of Season.” “Sultan of Swat Slams No. 714.” He did the improbable. In 1920, the Bambino blasted 54 home runs, more than any one team in the American League hit that year. He did the controversial. “He called a shot in the World Series!” … “No, he didn’t!”

Ruth suffered in 1925 from a bellyache “heard round the world.” Or, did he battle something more sinister? (“Syphilis,” some whispered.) He ate, drank, and wanted nothing more than to be merry. He punctuated the Roaring ‘20s.

Born in Baltimore, Ruth grew up rough and tumble. He learned baseball at the St. Mary’s Industrial School for Boys. He compiled a 94-46 won-loss mark as a big-league pitcher, complained that he wanted to play every day and then led the American League in home runs 12 times. Dizzy Dean said, “No one hits home runs the way Babe Ruth did. They were something special.” Ruth said of himself, “If I’d just tried for them dinky singles, I’d have hit .600.” Maybe.

Throat cancer did in the Babe. The day before he died on Aug. 16, Ruth said to the great Philadelphia A’s manager Connie Mack, “the termites have got me.”

Family and friends filled St Patrick’s Cathedral for Ruth’s funeral mass on Aug. 19 It was hot that day in New York City. One former Yankee supposedly turned to Ruth’s old teammate Waite Hoyt. “I could sure use a beer,” the ex-ballplayer said.

Hoyt: “So could the Babe.”

The funeral procession left St. Patrick’s Cathedral and headed north to the Gate of Heaven Cemetery in Hawthorne, N.Y., in Westchester County. About 6,000 people met the Babe’s casket.

Ruth’s second wife, Claire, who died in 1976, is buried next to her former husband (The Babe’s first wife, Helen, died in a fire in 1929.) The grave site is marked by a tall, sandblasted image of Christ with his arm on a young boy. The Ruths share space at Gate of Heaven with, among others, the actor Jimmy Cagney, the manager Billy Martin, writer Herman Melville, and the mobster Dutch Schultz.

Thousands of fans visit the Ruth site every year, according to an article written by Spencer Fordin for mlb.com. Some arrive by tour bus. In death, as in life, Babe Ruth remains an attraction. No one, not Cagney, not Martin, not Schultz, not Melville, the author of Moby Dick, gets as much attention as Ruth.

Some fans drop off a bat, a baseball or a ribbon from a youth baseball tournament, Fordin writes. Others bring a hot dog or a pizza. How many people have dropped off a beer?

Andrew Nagle, an employee of the cemetery, operated by the New York Archidiocese, confirms that the Babe tops ‘em all.

“No graves are visited like Babe Ruth’s grave,” he says.

George Herman Ruth Jr., the kid from the Baltimore waterfront, the “incorrigible” youngster dropped off at St. Mary’s, the one-time great pitcher, the long-time preeminent hitter, remains the stuff of legend, of tales fit for the ages.

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